My name is Connor, and I am a student at American University. I enjoy theatre, life, space, music, Battlestar Galactica, Stargate, etc. I'm just a funny nerd who enjoys it all.

 

spenceromg:

I hate it when netflix pauses and asks me if im still watching like yeah you actually think i got up and started doing something with my life bitch put my show back on

claphne:

whenever I’m traveling I always get tripped out at the fact that this is someone’s actual hometown like they know every back road and how to get everywhere and they’ve probably had tons of memories in this city

but I’m just someone passing by

Emmy Nominations 2014

popculturebrain:

Updated with more categories. Plus full list linked at the bottom.

popculturebrain:

Outstanding Drama

  • Breaking Bad
  • Downton Abbey
  • Game of Thrones
  • House of Cards
  • Mad Men
  • True Detective

Comedy

  • Big Bang Theory
  • Louie
  • Modern Family
  • OITNB
  • Silicon Valley
  • Veep

Lead Actor…

I’m conflicted about this list…

the-almost-doctor:

ifuckingguess:

ravedm:

ahh when you click it :)))

holy shit what is that seriously

space. that is space.

the-almost-doctor:

ifuckingguess:

ravedm:

ahh when you click it :)))

holy shit what is that seriously

space. that is space.

(Source: lsdex)

I firmly believe in small gestures: pay for their coffee, hold the door for strangers, over tip, smile or try to be kind even when you don’t feel like it, pay compliments, chase the kid’s runaway ball down the sidewalk and throw it back to him, try to be larger than you are— particularly when it’s difficult. People do notice, people appreciate. I appreciate it when it’s done to (for) me. Small gestures can be an effort, or actually go against our grain (“I’m not a big one for paying compliments…”), but the irony is that almost every time you make them, you feel better about yourself. For a moment life suddenly feels lighter, a bit more Gene Kelly dancing in the rain.

Jonathan Carroll (via onlinecounsellingcollege)

olivergaskarth:

thefoxalchemist:

falloutwookie:

I feel like everyone on the internet needs to see this

Everyone in the WORLD needs to see this.

This is so important

olivergaskarth:

thefoxalchemist:

falloutwookie:

I feel like everyone on the internet needs to see this

Everyone in the WORLD needs to see this.

This is so important

(Source: mindsrebelatstagnation)

irresponsibleeyouth:

The trick is to not let people know how really weird you are until it’s too late for them to back out.

(Source: crowzs)

goddessofsax:

Here’s a handy dandy color reference chart for you artists, writers, or any one else who needs it! Inspired by this post x

Abyss Table, a stunning coffee table that mimics the depths of the ocean with stacked layers of wood and glass. Made by London-based furniture design company Duffy London.

17-year-olds: When I have a job I'm gonna have my own apartment and I'm gonna gets lots of tattoos and piercings and I'm gonna go to lots of concerts and oh yeah I'm gonna go backpacking across Europe!!

20-somethings: Hey can I borrow a dollar so I can buy some more dollar store macaroni and cheese

9prodlums:

We never really thought about the burial industry going green, but it looks like they are.  Especially French designer Margaux Ruyant, who has designed a funeral urn that “evolves over time, allowing loved ones to plan a tree in the ashes, while also providing a simple but elegant monument.”

The Poetree is made out of a ceramic ring with the deceased’s details, plus a cork container and stopper. Relatives can place the deceased’s ashes in the urn and take it home, along with a boxwood tree sapling in a biodegradable pot. When they are ready, the cork stopper is removed, soil can be poured inside the urn, and the small tree may be planted in the ashes.

After giving the boxwood tree some time to grow, the urn can then be planted outside, where the cork container can biodegrade, leaving only the ceramic ring as a marker and a living, growing tree to commemorate those who have passed on. It’s a gorgeous idea that transforms the traditional ‘static’ view of death into something that is fluid and triumphantly hopeful.